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How to use Video within your Flipped Classroom

Watch and learn as Canvas Studio guru, Greg Faller demonstrates how this simple video tool can play an integral learning and analytical role for your flipped, blended or fully online learning model:

Video Transcript

 

Adam Ware:
Afternoon, everyone. Thank you very much for attending today's webinar. So, today we'll be talking about asynchronous learning and the use of that with Canvas Studio. As you mentioned before, in our last week's webinar, we did allude to a little bit about the powers of Studio.

Adam Ware:
Today, Greg's going to be taking more... Greg obviously does this more from a sales point of view, but today we're going to be doing it more from a training point of view, so to showcase to you how everything's going to flow through. I'd imagine there's going to be quite a lot of questions that people will have in relation to this, so please feel free to use the chat. I'm sure Greg put in some times for us to actually dive into those a little deeper. There will be some Canvas people jumping on this chat as well, so we'll also give that a little bit of context, as well.

Adam Ware:
As I said, please feel free to sit back, as this will be recorded and we'll share a copy of this slide deck as well. But yeah, please feel free to ask any questions that you may have. And now, I'm going to pass on to the master guru, Greg himself, to take it away.

Greg Faller:
Thanks, Adam. And as Rio said in the chat, there is hopefully a QA button that everyone can see and QA is something that will probably just alert me to direct questions rather than just chatter, so feel free to use chat, but if you have a question, Q and A, that would be great. So this afternoon, we're going to go through a presentation of, as Adam said, Studio, and we've titled this around the use of video in a flipped classroom.

Greg Faller:
So, I'm not sure how familiar people are with flipped classrooms, so I'll just try and give from my opinion, what I see the differences being. So really, it's a shift from that kind of classroom or lecturer based teacher centric view to something which is much more learner centric, where it's instead up to the learner to actually progress through their studies and then it's giving you time as a teacher to work through more direct problems or problems that students have based on the content that you've displayed to them. So, it sort of can be attributed back to two lecturers back in 2006 that initially called it reverse learning. They were using this within video podcasting, screen sharing and it was within a science class. Really, this became a bit more mainstream though with Khan Academy, so the guy behind Khan Academy, he actually put 3000 lessons on YouTube and ended up with 140 million views. And that model kind of became the Khan Academy model and that's where flipped classroom really started to get talked about a lot in media.

Greg Faller:
So, one thing that I wanted to put here is this little quote here, the theory behind this was initially wanting students to take more responsibility of their learning and then it's time that you have to spend with your students to go through meatier subject matter. So, I'm not sure whether people are really familiar with flipped classroom. I was going to stick a poll in here, but that didn't happen, but maybe in the chat, if you could just give me an idea of whether you know about flipped classroom or whether you're actually using it, that will sort of help guide how I talk about this as well.

Greg Faller:
But for those who have actually been in our sessions last week, Logan delivered some really great sessions on the use of asynchronous learning and a few other different paradigms. He presented this particular graph, which is something that was developed by Daniel Stanford from a university in Chicago, and really it's splitting everything into four different quadrants from, you can see on the left-hand side here, low immediacy and then all the way up to high immediacy, and then this vertical access is from low bandwidth up to high bandwidth.

Greg Faller:
So today, we're kind of looking at that top left quadrant. We're looking at things that are generally higher bandwidth, it's audio and video, but we can also talk about strategies to work with students who may not have great bandwidth as well. So, we'll talk about how we can create content, how we can create well-designed content for a flipped classroom, but really the purpose of this is to look at tools within Canvas and how they can be used to support the flipped classroom.

Greg Faller:
Another slide that I've stolen directly from Logan, I did tell him that I was going to, is that 80/20 model, where there's a recommendation out there, you can send out the content that we're delivering fully online, it's actually asynchronous, where students are responsible for their own learning. You see things like PDFs, videos, audio discussion forums. And then that 20% is coming together for synchronous activities like live chat and video conference. Definitely on the right hand side here, this is where we can do things like synchronously collaborate as a group. It's also a time for motivation, so to actually kind of encourage our students and to work out where they're at. So, we're looking at this 80% today and specifically around multimedia, audio and video.

Adam Ware:
So before we go any further, Greg, it seems like most of the people in the chat are pretty familiar with the flipped learning classroom model, so that's a pretty strong place to start.

Greg Faller:
Good. Well, hopefully I'm not being too patronizing to you. So, some of the positives that I see of going to an asynchronous model, especially around multimedia, so equity and access, we're going to look at some things today like the ability to auto caption videos. So, the ability for people who may struggle auditory, there's sort of an alternate for them, but also just things like being able to slow the video down, replay sections, so just things that are traditionally not available in an asynchronous classroom environment. The flexibility for your learning, so being able to come at that video at any point in the day, being able to re watch that obviously as well. One point that I really like to make around the use of video as well is I'm not sure whether we're thinking that your online learning is just going to be a temporary blip, but the sustainability, we're developing these resources so they can be used year on year.

Greg Faller:
So rather than a virtual classroom, where that recording is traditionally something that you ditch at the end of the term or the semester, hopefully these recordings are going to be really bite-sized and they're going to be something that you can reuse, recycle year on year or semester on semester. And then using some of the strategies that's out there in the research, being able to chunk your learning into small videos, sort of sub 10 minutes, we've been able to kind of really segment those videos and helps to scaffold students in the module layout. But some considerations, obviously we're not there to support our learners when they're watching video asynchronously. And I'm going to acknowledge, this is probably a large workload to get these short videos set up. It's sort of a skill set that a lot of teachers might not possess, being able to see how they can split their sort of lecture style delivery into small videos, so that is an acquired skill.

Greg Faller:
And then also, we'll look today at how we can monitor statistics and how we can embed things like quizzing into these videos to help track our students' progress as well. So just try to acknowledge that, obviously video is not the one solution here, but today we're looking at Studio. And Studio, we'll look at the uploaded video, so if you already have content lying around, definitely we can find some benefits within Studio around engaging your students. We can also in Studio create content, whether it's from your webcam or a screen recording, so recording a presentation with your face under at the same time. Around engagement, so we can do things like comment on the video like we're seeing here. We can also quiz students as well, so there's a form of assessment and analytics built into the Studio platform.

Greg Faller:
And we can also use Studio as a tool for students to actually submit an assessment, so right at the end, we'll show you a studio video built into this speed grader interface. So being able to provide your students a video that they've uploaded themselves in context feedback, so you can say at the minute 45 mark, you kept looking down at your page, couldn't understand what you're saying. That really contextual feedback is also what we're going to look at today. So this is a little bit of a summary of what we're going to cover, but any questions before we kick it off or good to jump into Canvas?

Adam Ware:
Yeah, because once he starts, there's no going back. No, you're all tied in.

Greg Faller:
So, let me just set up my screen.

Adam Ware:
Now we've got people who are keen. They're ready for you. This is good.

Greg Faller:
Excellent. So I'm currently in my Canvas Instance, this is the one that I use for demoing and with Studio installed down the left-hand side of the screen, we'll see a Studio link. So this is one way that we can get to the Studio or say, Studio will appear within the Rich Content Editor if you enable this for assessment, students can submit directly for Studio, but this sort of global navigation, this is where we're seeing all video that we have access to, whether it's something we uploaded or something that's been shared to us as well. So my Studio library is made up of a number of different videos, whether it's something I've created or it might be a YouTube video that I've linked through to. So we can see down in this library, little icons here indicates that I've actually linked directly through to a YouTube video. Everything else is content that I've uploaded.

Greg Faller:
When we do come to add content, we can either drag and drop files. As I mentioned earlier, we can link through to YouTube. So if I just go and copy a video that Instructional recently published, we can really quickly add resources that aren't necessarily ours, things that are out there in the public domain inside YouTube. But if we're adding our own content, as I said, drag and drop into the middle of the editor, or we can go through the browse files process and we can upload content that we already have on our machines. Once content has been uploaded, any files that we own, we can actually use technology within Studio to automatically caption those videos, so when we look at the equity and access of these videos, the captioning is really brilliant for a number of different learning needs.

Greg Faller:
We can also upload captions of different languages as well. We can't automatically caption into different languages, but within this, We See You, Teachers video, I've pre created those captions with our automated service. And so, within this caption tab, we'll see that I have the ability to review and publish those captions. So we don't generate the captions for you and automatically put them on the video, it's something that we come into, these three dots, click edit, and that would show me the speaking starts at the 41 second mark. When I click on 41 seconds, it begins to play back. We can read through those captions, make sure that everything's okay. When we're done, we can click publish, and those will be made available to our students.

Greg Faller:
So, just to introduce you to the Studio player, some really nice things within the player itself is that we can actually control the playback speed of those videos, so we can go from a sort of 0.5 all the way up to two. So if it's really boring content, we can go on double speed. And also, students have the ability to choose their playback, what am I trying to say, quality. So, if your users have low bandwidth, Studio will automatically convert these video files in up to four different quality levels. So kind of like YouTube in that regard, students on low bandwidth can select that low quality and that's automatic behind the scenes in Studio. Every single course that we have content in will automatically populate on the left-hand side of the screen here, so if I want to look at all of the video I've uploaded into my certificate three course in captive animals, this will then filter down to just the video content that's been added into this course.

Greg Faller:
So, I can click on any of these video files and we can view things like any comments that have been added to that video that relate to cert three in captive animals. Or if the video has a quiz, we can look at the quiz results directly from here as well. So, we'll actually come back to the quiz creation process and how students complete quizzes a bit later, but what's really nice is if we're using these tools, we're actually delivering concepts to students. We can assess them mid video to help with knowledge retention and we can also then get reports back on how the students have gone in those quizzes. So we can see individual results at a question level. We can also see individual student results for that quiz as well. So, here we can see the grade distribution from my class, and we can also look at each question, see which answers the student was getting right or wrong and that might help me when we come to our synchronous session time, to highlight an issue that a lot of students were struggling with and we can focus in on that concept.

Greg Faller:
So, if we actually jumped into the Canvas course now and have a look at how we can embed video resources, I'll come into that certificate three course, and I can see a question in there, or a chat about anything for deaf students. So the captioning is probably the only thing we could talk about in terms of good for deaf students, so those captions will automatically display if the users select to have English captions enabled. And then other things like being able to develop the transcripts, you might be able to upload a separate transcript for those videos or additional resources that go along with those video files may assist. Especially if you're doing something like a screen recording of a PowerPoint presentation, you can upload that PowerPoint below the video, students can open that PowerPoint up and get everything in a text readable format as well.

Greg Faller:
So, I've come into this Canvas resource. We have a Studio video in here, so we would definitely come in and edit this resource to show you how that's done. But what I wanted to highlight is within this video file, with a teacher permission, we get this insights tab and insights is going to show me how many students clicked play on that video file and how far through they go as well. So earlier, we mentioned around the fact that obviously, if we're not doing a virtual classroom, there's no way of tracking what our students are doing. Within this video file, we can at least see that six students click play, but actually only two of those made it the whole way through. So if you're really keen, we can actually filter down and see exactly who those students were. We can see that Annie and Ashley watched the whole thing, Jin watched two seconds, Aaron watched about 15, so that's one way that we can monitor who's engaging with our resources.

Adam Ware:
And a lot of, just furthering onto that as well, I know that a lot of people from further education RTO are asking similar sorts of things for a while. That's a great way to show that people are actually engaging with the content, they're watching it, you can obviously report on that as well. So just as another thing to keep in the back of your mind as well.

Greg Faller:
And then another way that we can monitor engagement and we can actually be alerted to engagement is if students comment on that video. These comments are timestamped, so I can click at that three second mark and see what Natalie was adding, what she was commenting on to the context. We can also see those replies. And then as we scroll down, we can see all the other comments that have been added. So, if I subscribed to these comments, I can be alerted as a teacher to when someone's engaging on that video resource.

Greg Faller:
So, the way that we've added this video into Canvas is by clicking edit. One of the external tools that you can work with is Studio. So anywhere within a resource, whether it's a page like we're in here, an announcement, students submitting an assignment, anywhere that we see the Rich Content Editor we can add in Studio video. So, I'll create some space here for a video and from my Rich Content Editor, we will be able to interact with the Studio external tool. So I can tap in Studio, and this will open up the Studio interface. So from here, we can add any existing video resources. We can embed a quiz. We can actually create content from here. So again, directly from our webcam or uploading video, and we can filter down to also content that's been shared with us. So, if we know a teacher from a different discipline who shared a video with us, all of that content is actually surfaced in this menu on the left-hand side here.

Greg Faller:
We got a repository that's code shared with me, and that's where we'll be able to find the content that other people have provided for us. But back in my media, I'll choose a video where there's a quiz embedded. No, I won't. I'll just choose a normal video. So, one thing you might be wondering is that commenting interface, is that always visible? That's something you can actually toggle on and off. So We See You, Teachers, this might just be a video that we want our students to watch, a really quick introduction perhaps, we can disable commenting, and we can also toggle downloading on or off. So, downloading is obviously really brilliant for users if they're potentially on low bandwidth or going to be offline altogether, they can download that video and watch that at any stage.

Greg Faller:
So, we just got a question come through, is Studio a standard option or additional? So Studio is in addition that standard Canvas contract, so some people here may already have Studio enabled. Probably the easiest way is to look on the left-hand side of your Canvas global navigation and that will tell you if Studio is there.

Greg Faller:
So, I'm going to embed this video with downloads enabled, commenting disabled, and that will embed that directly into the [inaudible 00:17:50] for me. So that's how we add content, same process for a student as it is for a teacher. And what I might do is actually cancel all of those changes, don't want to keep any of that, but it's probably worth mentioning as well, if we are talking about the flipped classroom, another tool that's really useful here is that we can add content pages where there's no assessment involved to a student's to do list. So if we were coming together at, let's have a look here, tomorrow, and we're going to come together for eventual classroom at 3:00 PM. I might set this as something on the students' to do list at 12 mid day, and that will then alert them to come here, watch that video, complete all of those resources, before they come to our virtual session.

Greg Faller:
The next resource that we actually have in our modular list is an example of a Studio video with a quiz embedded into it. So jumping into the next page here, and this will just give you an idea of what we can do with a video quiz. So, this particular video, we designed a really simple quiz and we're actually showing students when those questions will appear on the video timeline. We can hide questions from student view as well so they have to watch the whole video. But if we click resume quiz here, I've already started this video, with my teacher permissions, we can also see quiz results, but this is the view that the student would see at the top here. So they will see the video playing back. These blue dots indicate questions that the students would see in the timeline. They're really basic question types to ensure that Canvas can automatically grade.

Greg Faller:
So we have multiple choice, multi-answer and true, false questions built into Studio. So, we can re watch the segment before this particular question was asked, but I'll continue. At the end of this video, students can get their immediate results and reattempt if necessary. So this is where we can also check the quiz results. Again, this might be something that's relevant for a virtual classroom, so rather than actually having to monitor insights, we can just get a really quick look at how students completed that video quiz in that quiz results tab.

Greg Faller:
As we looked at earlier, we can get that item analysis, but we can also break that down to an individual student level. So mine would take a little time to load, because I completed this quiz most days with one of my demo students, but this will allow us to come into a particular student, click on their individual attempts and we can actually see what response they gave to each question within the quiz as well. So this is really detailed feedback if you need it, but otherwise we can just return a grade to grade book as well.

Greg Faller:
So, I can see one question there about is this accessible in the student app? Definitely it is. Students can watch video. They can upload video into Studio directly from the apps as well.

Adam Ware:
Okay, so just coming back to that, Philip, we'll go through how to create quiz a little bit later, so we'll do that through at the end here. Actually, we're about to go through it now. The other question that we had on the live Q and A there, Greg, this question about how much spacing gigs do you get with your Studio subscription?

Greg Faller:
Yeah, so we actually pull allocation together, so it's basically dependent on how many users you have in your platform. And we pull together a gigabyte per user, and then we only count the video that's actually uploaded into Studio, so all of those copies that we make in those different qualities, that's not counted towards your Studio allocation.

Greg Faller:
So to my knowledge, that sort of pooled gigabyte, no customers have yet to go over that allocation, but our excess to [inaudible 00:21:33] is actually quite reasonable as well. I'm in the sales department, but I'm not a sales person, so I really don't know. You have to reach out to your CSM if you want any more info.

Adam Ware:
Yeah, 100%. So just coming back to that, some people have asked, that's about that. And then obviously, we've had a few questions asked about, can you add an essay type question in the quizzes Studio? I'm sure Greg, you're going to go through that pretty soon. And we've also had another question about obviously doing another temp, once they move on as well. So all those sort of quiz related queries, we're about to roll through that now. So thank you very much. Remember if you do have any questions, click on the Q and A button at the top and Greg and myself, we'll get to it, but please feel free to keep chatting in the chat as well.

Speaker 3:
And just before you move on, I should also point out that once you upload a video, you can reuse it again and again and again, and each time you reuse it that doesn't get counted either. It's just the single video, so storage isn't, like Greg said, we rarely see people hitting that, yet anyway.

Adam Ware:
Yeah, yet. All right, Greg, I think it's back on to you, sir.

Greg Faller:
All right, so I think the kind of questions are centered around how to create a video, so I might go into an existing quiz and then we'll create a new one as well. So, when we actually look at a video, and there's a different icon that will appear on Studio videos that we've actually embedded quizzes into. So, when we look through our library, we should be able to sort of really quickly identify videos that have quizzes embedded as this icon, top right-hand corner, we've got that little rocket icon that you might be familiar with in Canvas. So, when I click on these little dots on the video, we can hover over quizzes. We can see all of the existing quizzes that have been embedded into this video, so it's not just one video to one quiz, you can upload one video and attach four different quizzes. That might be that you use it across year levels and you want to kind of increasingly... Actually, you might even just use this week one versus week 10 and just increase the difficulty of those questions or mix things up.

Greg Faller:
So, when we go into test your knowledge, this video will load into the quiz editor, so here we can see that there's only one question in that timeline. I can click on the pencil icon, and that will allow me to edit that particular question. This animal is a sloth, true or false? That's incredible. We can also attach specific feedback based on whether the student gets the answer correct or incorrect. So when they do see their quiz results, they can see that specific feedback, potentially with links out to additional information within your Canvas environment, as well. To add a new question into this video, resume editing, save. To add a new question, we just jump into the timeline where we want to add that question to the quiz, click plus, and I really should have thought of a question before I came here, but here are the question options that we have available. Multiple choice question. I don't know. What animal is this? Sloth.

Greg Faller:
This is the peak of my creativity today. We've got the normal options that we see within a quiz. We can shuffle choices. We can vary points by answer, so if we think that cat is almost correct, we can give that one mark out of two. Really up to you what we're doing here, but these options should be really familiar if you're using our new quizzing tool. So again, we can offer that question feedback at the question level, but I would just click save on that question. So, that's all that we need to do to add questions to a video and this particular video as well, there's only one or two settings, really, for you to add. The video title, probably worth knowing that we shouldn't be giving too much data away here, because students see that video title before they begin the quiz. And then this option is kind of cool as well.

Greg Faller:
So we can actually hide from the video timeline when those quiz questions will appear. Obviously when we embed a quiz, that disables the ability to comment on that video as well. So hiding the markers means that a student has to watch that whole video before they will know where the questions appear, so that's sort of another reason to hide that if you're really desperate for your students to watch the entire clip. So that's the process to add a video or a quiz into a video. And then, I haven't gone through the process of actually embedding that within Canvas, but I can see there's a couple of questions that have come through.

Adam Ware:
So there I can see, so Rog just asked one, the quizzes which students complete on these videos, does the score get pushed to the grade book? And the answer is...

Greg Faller:
If you would like it to. It's a good question. [crosstalk 00:26:18] So, if you create this video as a Canvas assignment, you can then attach that quiz question or the quiz into the assignment, that grade will be returned to the grade book. Otherwise, you can just embed that into our resource and it's more like a formative task where there's no grades involved at all.

Greg Faller:
And the other question is about internet connectivity loss, so the quiz would not auto submit, the student would just be able to come back and continue that attempt, so there's no kind of advanced options on these video quizzes about maxing the number of attempts or putting a time limit on that or anything like that. The student would just come back to that video, click resume, like you saw when I went into the quiz earlier.

Adam Ware:
Thanks for the question. Yeah, it looks like we've managed to answer most of those, so that's good. But yeah, keep your questions coming and also, Rio is putting in some links to community guides and things like that. You can see everything about what we're doing. They're all featured as guides on the community as well, but I'll pass back over to Greg.

Greg Faller:
Beautiful. So I just wanted to go through actually adding a video quiz just to prove that it exists and then we'll look at how to actually assess students within a Studio video context as well. So, if I click a new announcement, I'll add a video quiz into an announcement, probably not the best example here, but I just go to Rich Content Editor. So that same process that we went through earlier, where we from the Rich Content Editor found Studio as an external tool, when we find a video where there's a quiz involved, we get some different options. So I'll find our Studio option yet again. Oops, what did I do wrong?

Greg Faller:
Something. Yeah, Adelaide internet. So here's my Studio window. So when we come to add a video where there's a quiz involved, once we've added a quiz to our video, we'll be able to see again, that icon, that indicates there's a quiz. And when we select that tile, we can actually choose what video quiz we want to embed or whether it's just the default video as well. So, here's that David Attenborough video, we can click on it and this time we'll get the option to attach a video quiz. So video quiz embed, and I can choose that test your knowledge quiz that we looked at earlier, embed that video, and that's the process for putting one of those quizzes, if we don't want the grade feedback to grade book into Canvas.

Greg Faller:
So, we've almost gone through all of those bullet points earlier. The very last point is not so much around assessing students, but actually looking at a student's video assessment within the Studio context. So, if I go to my dashboard and we'll have a look at a preexisting video that's been submitted, and there's an assignment here that I uploaded a few hours ago and the students submitted within Studio. So speed grader that you'd be familiar with, this time we'll actually see Studio embedded on the left-hand side, where we see a student's submission. So Natalie submitted this video earlier and it's actually just a link through to YouTube, so students can upload their content into YouTube if they wanted public facing, or they can upload it directly into Studio as well.

Greg Faller:
So, here we can see that I've already added a comment to the student at the 32nd mark in the timeline and we can see that there's three questions added. So rather than just annotation feedback or overall comments, we can actually add that contextual feedback into the video. So, I have actually just linked through to a how to submit an assignment in Canvas video that some universities published, but students, when they're playing back their submission, will be able to say these in context feedback from the teacher and they also have that opportunity to reply to those comments as well. So really nice. We can obviously have multiple markers come in and provide that feedback as well and that's pretty much all I wanted to show you with Studio. So, Adam, have you had any other questions come through or any other questions that people want to ask?

Adam Ware:
Yeah, so we just had one that actually came through about, can the questions be in different languages? So, I suppose that comes down to the language packs that you got on your computer, where you can ask those questions. That would be my correction, right?

Greg Faller:
Yeah, so you can definitely write the questions in a different language, but there's no ability to kind of based on the user's preference have that sort of translate or you can't add to the questions in multiple languages, I should say. So yeah, the language that you create those in is the language the students will see them.

Adam Ware:
Yep. And also the question, does Canvas have an offline mode feature?

Greg Faller:
Yeah, so Canvas has an offline mode feature, it's specifically around downloading course content, so we can download packages like the entire module structure as an EPUB or an HTML format. For things like Studio, Studio won't come down in those packages, because it is an external tool, so that's probably something where we would actually, if you have a need for those offline packages to work, we can either enable those downloads so that students can go through download the video content, or it can be uploaded to Canvas separately and that will be brought down in those zip packages as well.

Adam Ware:
Awesome, no problems at all. That's awesome. And obviously we've just gone through there, how do students submit via Studio? So when you set the assignment up, what you can do is you can choose the external LTI to be submitted via Studio. And then that will obviously assist them with the workflow, what they need to go through to answer that. So once again, we can provide some more answers for that, via the guide. [inaudible 00:32:15], the one gig video limit occupy the same space. It's probably something that we should talk about. We can explain to you as part of, when you're looking at subscriptions and all these sorts of things, how that works. And is it possible for the teacher to share student videos with the entire class? So you were just mentioning before, Greg, that you can pull down the video?

Greg Faller:
Yeah, so a teacher could download the video, but I think probably the way that we'd suggest it is actually to subsequent to an assignment that the student submits, if you get your students to go into something like a discussion forum, and I guess that's more of an opt-in style where students are able to submit the video. The other way that we can do that is to enable peer assessment on that assessment. We can then automatically allocate those videos to a number of different reviewers, so students can then peer review each other's work. But for instance, after a student submitted to an assignment, they could come into a discussion and they then have that same ability to add student peer content into Canvas.

Adam Ware:
100%. So in other words, what we're doing is, you can't just obviously show it, but what you can do is, they can either submit via Studio. Alternatively, if you'd like to showcase the work, you can download it, bring it in, make it part of the discussion, then obviously do it from there. So yeah, that's probably one of the workarounds and obviously we just discussed the peer review method there as well. But yeah, thanks for that, Greg. It's always good. I actually learned something during that, so about the captioning, which I didn't know that we could do, so it's always pretty exciting when I come back and I learn something new. So sorry if any of my clients are on here and I'm giving you a wrong answer, I will apologize profusely the next time we catch up.

Adam Ware:
So, if you'd like to, we've got a few more minutes. If anyone has any questions, once again, a copy of this recording and the slide deck will be made available to you. We encourage these webinars to be shared with absolutely everybody, so there is nothing here that's unique to just admins or anything like that. We're just trying to showcase the services as well. Studio can form a really big part with how everything's going. We've all got phones in our pockets. It's a great way to capture video and getting people used to that sort of medium as well. So, I've just got one last question, so I may have missed it, but we are trying to set up some quizzes so that students can only move on once they've answered correctly, can this be done?

Greg Faller:
Yeah, so in that case, you'd probably have to set this up as an assignment and then we could enable, or we could utilize the module completion criteria, so basically we could say until you've achieved 100% on this video, based on the grade that's going back into the grade book, they won't be able to move on to subsequent resources. Either they won't actually be able to click next, or we can sort of lock the following module as well. Really up to you, but that's just using these module completion criteria. So this example, we need to score at least 70 out of 100 on a quiz.

Adam Ware:
Correct, so in other words, those principles already exist now with standard assignments and standard quizzes already. What we're simply doing is that by putting this quiz into Studio, it still forms part of the same framework of how you control your module set up and everything like that.

Greg Faller:
I realized, Adam, that have forgotten one kind of big component and that's screen recording in Studio as well.

Adam Ware:
Yeah. Yeah. [inaudible 00:35:45].

Greg Faller:
So, the very last thing to talk about, this is probably one of the easiest ways to get up and use video for flipped classroom. It might be just restructuring your PowerPoint presentations into smaller segments of content. We have a built-in screen capture tool in Studio, so basically that allows you to screen record a PowerPoint presentation, as well as your webcam. Or you can just have your screen or just your webcam. This tool is really nice, because it allows you to make edits on your video, so the content that's actually in Studio is static, so there's no editability to that content.

Greg Faller:
The content that you screen record, before you upload it into Studio, you can cut sections out. If you make a little mistake, you can annotate on it, you can add call outs, all of that sort of functionality is possible. So, I'm just launching this screen recorder now, and this will basically allow me to select what element of the screen I need to be recorded and whether I'm having both my screen or just my webcam, all of that fun stuff. When we click record, it will count us in and that's the process. Once we've done our recording, we can fine tune those edits, so let me just get into my editing interface.

Greg Faller:
But basically, this is where we can trim that video down and cut out little sections that we've made mistakes on before we actually upload that back into Canvas.

Adam Ware:
We'll probably do this on this webinar, because we make stuff ups all the time.

Greg Faller:
Exactly, so definitely an important thing to have missed, so apologies. I think that's the last thing that we wanted to cover there.

Adam Ware:
No, it's all right, no problems at all. And as mentioned before, obviously if you've got a situation where there's a number of teachers say for instance, and I'll just start out, say for instance, English and someone's teaching a particular text maybe, and then another teacher's teaching another text, leveraging off this can help you develop those online resources even faster, because you're obviously prerecording some classrooms, some work, all these sorts of things and then you can share that amongst your teachers, whether that's by commons, direct share, so many different things, so it can form a really good part of the future of your content management strategy and the future collaboration of teachers for not only your school, but in your department or across multiple different schools if you feel like you want to share your work that way.

Adam Ware:
But once again, thank you everyone for attending this afternoon. It's absolutely fantastic. We still got the great attendance that we do in the midst of everything that's going on. As always, if you have any questions about Studio, like how can we get it, please feel free to reach out to your CSM. They'll put you in touch with an [RD 00:38:32] and we'll make sure that we arrange that for you. Once again, all the guides or any other further information are available in the Canvas community, as well as a copy of this recording and slides. So once again, thank you so much for your time today. Remember to wash your hands and yeah, we'll speak to you all tomorrow. If you're joining us on our next webinar, which is on baseline standards, it's more skewed toward K12 and we'll be getting some more content and invites out to you about next week's webinars as well. But until then, thank you so much everyone, stay safe and we'll speak to you soon.

Greg Faller:
Thanks everyone.