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Canvas Essentials: Fostering Collaboration and Resource Sharing for Academics

In this scenario-based video you’ll follow  Professor Amy de Ravin, Faculty eLearning Support Harleen Jackson and Lecturer Wendy Hsu as they navigate fostering collaboration and resource sharing for academics. You'll learn how Canvas supports collaboration and resource sharing among teaching staff, regardless of their location

 

Video Transcript

Personas:

  1. Coordinator: Prof. Amy de Ravin
  2. Faculty eLearning Support: Harleen Jackson
  3. Lecturer: Wendy Hsu


Part A: Professor Amy de Ravin runs Introduction to Behavioural Health, a course that’s taught across a number of locations in Australia. Amy wants to ensure that her teaching team is in close communication and equipped to provide a consistent level of support to students, regardless of their location. Amy also wants her teaching team to share resources and best practice with each other via Canvas. 

Part B: Harleen helps maintain Canvas Commons for a University. She wants to add a Canvas module on multimodal learning to Commons and make sure it’s easy for academic staff to find. Harleen has also been asked by a Community of Practice in her faculty to create a new group in Commons where they can collaborate and share best practice and resources. 

Screnario
Part A

In this video, we’ll demonstrate how Canvas supports collaboration and resource sharing among teaching staff, regardless of their location.

Professor Amy de Ravin coordinates the course ‘Introduction to Behavioural Health’. 

This course is delivered in various locations across Australia, which means Amy’s team of tutors and markers can’t have face-to-face meetings. Amy therefore wants to establish ways to communicate and collaborate within Canvas.

From the Dashboard, Amy accesses the Canvas inbox and opens a new message. 

She selects the Behavioural Health course, where she can send messages to specific users or roles. In this case,  she chooses to advise all tutors of an upcoming video conference she’s organising.

Amy also wants to create a space where the teaching team can ask questions and discuss the course. 

She creates an unpublished Discussion that’s not visible to students. The teaching team can easily participate in this Discussion using their computer or the Canvas Teacher App.

A member of the  teaching team has also created some great new resources that Amy would like to make available to the Session 1 course. 

Amy can choose to send these resources to the  teacher, Wendy, or add them straight into the Session 1 course.

She decides to send them to Wendy, who can access the resources from the Shared Content menu and add them into her course in her own time.

Part B

We’ll now demonstrate how you can use Canvas Commons to find, categorise, import, and share course content across your institution.

Harleen helps maintain Commons, Canvas’s Learning Object Repository.

She’s been asked to add a Canvas module on multimodal learning to Commons. 

Harleen locates this module in a course, and selects ‘Share to Commons’.

Harleen makes this module available to the entire institution, and flags it as institution-approved content. She adds a description of the content as well as tags to aid discoverability. 

As this is a brand new resource that will be promoted by the Deputy Vice Chancellor, Harleen sets it as Featured Content. This means it will appear at the top of the list of resources in Commons.

Harleen goes back to Commons to check how this resource will be displayed to staff.

The eLearning Community of Practice has also asked Harleen to create a group space where they can collaborate in Commons. 

She creates a new group and invites the members of this community of practice to join. They can now share content amongst each other before making it available to the entire institution. 

Finally, Harleen accesses the statistics tab to view data on how the institution-approved content is being adopted across the University. She extracts this data into a report for her manager.