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Some things just go together. Like yin and yang, eggs and bacon, or Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. A core Canvas belief is that innovation and education go together, too. So five months ago, we offered $100k in Canvas Grants to encourage all of you to join us in merging innovation and education.

elephantSometimes a favorable matchup will
surprise you.

The response was mind-blowing. We received more than 400 submissions, and passed them on to our panel of experts who selected ten winners of $5,000 in the category of K-12 and five winners of $10,000 in the category of higher education. So without further ado, here’s the complete line up of 2014 Canvas Grants winners, whose brilliant ideas combined innovation and education in the most difference-making, world-changing ways.

K-12 Winners

  1. Julie Braly with the Video Think Project, winner of the “1:1 Initiatives” category for her interest in exploring how student-generated video can play a greater role in the classroom.

  2. Larry Mendte with the Philadelphia School District, winner of the “Extending the Classroom” category for his plan to equip inner-city schoolchildren with the resources to record stories about their communities and to share them with the world via the Web and as part of a TV show.

  3. Jonathan Briggs with Eastside Preparatory School, winner of the “Involving Parents in Meaningful Ways” category for his proposal to create user-friendly dashboards for parents, so they can know how to get involved in helping their students.

  4. Aaron Cuny with Ingenuity Prep, winner of the “Meeting Demands of Standards” category for his work utilizing video in a purposeful and structured manner to build school community around a blended learning model.

  5. Bonni Jones with Venture Academy High School, winner of the “Personalized Learning Paths” category for her effort to create quest-based learning applets that are open and work on any device.

  6. Nancy Jo Lambert with Ruth Borchardt Elementary Frisco ISD, winner of the “PK-5 Technology” category for her plan to create a Makerspace in her school with LEGOS, littleBits and MinecraftEdu licenses.

  7. Daniel Ching with Minarets High School, winner of the “Project-based Learning” category for focusing on preserving the language and cultural heritage of the North Fork Rancheria of Mono Indians, one of the largest tribes in California.

  8. Erica Marshall with Huntington County Community School Corporation, winner of the “Special Education” category for helping students with cognitive disabilities integrate into the community through technology and a cooperative with the local university.

  9. Andrew Hollstein with North Penn School District, winner of the “STEM” category for his goal of providing students with an opportunity for real-world problem solving by using the engineering design process and the scientific method. Grant funds will allow students to be introduced to the world of 3-D printing and the many impacts it has on society.

  10. Garrett Barnes, Environmental And Spatial Technology (EAST) facilitator with Douglas MacArthur Junior High School, winner of the “Universal Design for Learning” category for his EAST program's commitment to design, develop and implement an app that will help assimilate Spanish-speaking students to English-speaking environments in both their school and community.

Higher Education Winners

  1. Ted Curran with Carnegie Mellon University, winner of the “Facilitating Competency-Based Learning” category for his goal to create personalized plans/dashboards so students can see how they track against their own educational and career objectives.

  2. Virginia Stewart Huntley with Alamo Colleges, winner of the “Engaging Students Throughout Their Education” category for her request to use problem-based learning and a cloud-based, open source ePortfolio solution as part of an interdisciplinary core curriculum program.

  3. Robin Bartoletti with Texas Woman's University and North Central Texas College, winner of the “Blended Online and Face-to-Face Courses” category for her plan to create a blended learning MOOC that can evangelize the maker movement.

  4. Katherine Winsett with the University of Southern Indiana, winner of the “New Models of Content Curriculum Development and Sharing” category for her work to develop a tool that makes it possible to conduct robust data collection, analysis and collaboration to support active inquiry.

  5. Karen Tinsley-Kim with the University of Central Florida, winner of the “Applying Universal Design to Online Learning” category for her proposal to develop a tool that will allow instructors to quickly and easily review their course content for accessibility and universal design compliance.

Click here if you are interested in learning more about our winners' brilliant ideas. Now it’s time for these innovative ideas to become reality—because grant funding and extraordinary progress go together, too. 

Keep learning,
Brian

P.S. Do you have a brilliant idea for next year? Sign up now to be notified when we roll out Canvas Grants 2015.