Instructure Blog


Voices of Instructure: Best Practices for Closing the Gender Wage Gap

Two years ago, I left a great team and a well-known company to take a job that required a move to a state that is historically known as one of the worst for gender pay equality. The decision was made after I had done research about the challenges many women face in Utah when it comes to pay equality. However, I wasn’t worried because I’d also had some great conversations with the Instructure HR team and was impressed with their commitment to making the company, to use their own words, “an awesome place to work for everyone.” 

To them, and now to me, part of that awesomeness means ensuring that Instructure actively monitors the salaries of its employees and addresses what I call the “gender wage gap creep.” This means a lot to our head of people and places, who is also involved with the Women's Leadership Institute (WLI) as a member of their Advisory Board. The WLI and the Salt Lake Chamber recently worked together to publish the guide “Best Practices for Closing the Gender Wage Gap.” 

The guide’s introduction notes, “Elevating women by closing the gender wage gap will strengthen our workforce by enhancing our ability to find and retain the talent we need to address Utah’s tight labor market and further contribute to the growth of our state’s economy.”  

The guide offers some advice that we actively follow at Instructure, including:

  • Conduct an analysis of your company’s pay distribution by role, level, location, and gender.
     
    • Instructure conducts an annual salary pay equity review. Some resulting actions include: 

      • Proactively providing salary increases to address pay inequity issues 

      • Spending time training managers of teams where inequities were discovered 

         
  • Provide unconscious bias training for employees

  • Provide training for those involved in the hiring process 

  • Avoid asking for previous wage information during the hiring process 

  • Set pay ranges based on market pay ranges and value added to the organization before the hiring process begins 

  • Consider rewriting job descriptions to remove gender biases 

  • Build in objective tools and processes to remove gender biases from the recruiting and hiring processes 


 

For more information, or to get a digital copy of the “Best Practices Guide for Closing the Gender Wage Gap,” visit slchamber.com/wagegap or wliut.com/wagegap.
 

Becky Frost
Senior Director, Communications